U.S. Presidents
Things to See & Do in Virginia
George Washington Birthplace National Monument
People have made the pilgrimage to the birthplace of George Washington since 1815. Visitors from all over the world have come to see where the first President of the United States was born. Today this 550-acre park memorializes George Washington and the place of his birth. The park includes: Visitor Center; the brick foundation of the house where he was born; the Washington family cemetery where George’s father, grandfather, and great-grandfather are buried; the historical area with the Memorial House, kitchen, and typical plantation surroundings; the picnic grounds with a nature trail; and the Potomac River beach area. Here, in these sublime surroundings, one can sense the character and spirit of the great whole man.
Theodore Roosevelt Island National Memorial
Theodore Roosevelt was a man with vision. He considered the future before making decisions and his legacies still influence us. Perhaps his greatest legacy was in conservation. This wooded island is a fitting memorial to the outdoorsman, naturalist, and visionary who was our 26th President. After Roosevelt's death on January 6, 1919, citizens wanted to establish a memorial in his honor. The 91 acre wooded island in the Potomac seemed the perfect place. The Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Association purchased the island in 1932. Congress approved funds in 1960 and the memorial was dedicated on October 27, 1967.
Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac National Memorial
The Memorial is located in Lady Bird Johnson Park, a Potomac River island in Washington, D.C. The grove consists of two parts. The first area, commemorative in nature, is a granite monolith surrounded by a serpentine pattern of walks and trails. The second area is a grass meadow and provides a tranquil refuge for reflection and rejuvination of the spirit. The trails are shaded by a grove of hundreds of white pine and dogwood trees, and framed by azaleas and rhododendron.
Featured Resources

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