Research & Statistics
Learn about current research and statistics involving homeschooling families, the homeschool movement, and the educational system.
Links and Items
Kingdom of Children : Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)

More than one million American children are schooled by their parents. As their ranks grow, home schoolers are making headlines by winning national spelling bees and excelling at elite universities. The few studies conducted suggest that homeschooled children are academically successful and remarkably well socialized. Yet we still know little about this alternative to one of society's most fundamental institutions. Beyond a vague notion of children reading around the kitchen table, we don't know what home schooling looks like from the inside.

Sociologist Mitchell Stevens goes behind the scenes of the homeschool movement and into the homes and meetings of home schoolers. What he finds are two very different kinds of home education--one rooted in the liberal alternative school movement of the 1960s and 1970s and one stemming from the Christian day school movement of the same era. Stevens explains how this dual history shapes the meaning and practice of home schooling today. In the process, he introduces us to an unlikely mix of parents (including fundamentalist Protestants, pagans, naturalists, and educational radicals) and notes the core values on which they agree: the sanctity of childhood and the primacy of family in the face of a highly competitive, bureaucratized society.

Kingdom of Children aptly places home schoolers within longer traditions of American social activism. It reveals that home schooling is not a random collection of individuals but an elaborate social movement with its own celebrities, networks, and characteristic lifeways. Stevens shows how home schoolers have built their philosophical and religious convictions into the practical structure of the cause, and documents the political consequences of their success at doing so.

Ultimately, the history of home schooling serves as a parable about the organizational strategies of the progressive left and the religious right since the 1960s.Kingdom of Children shows what happens when progressive ideals meet conventional politics, demonstrates the extraordinary political capacity of conservative Protestantism, and explains the subtle ways in which cultural sensibility shapes social movement outcomes more generally.

Research Organizations
The Home School Researcher
This quarterly, refereed, scholarly journal presents basic research on home- and family-based education in areas such as socialization, academic achievement, history, and law. This unique periodical keeps home educators, researchers, and others abreast of the most current factual and theoretical research information available on home education.
Research Organizations
The Home School Researcher
This quarterly, refereed, scholarly journal presents basic research on home- and family-based education in areas such as socialization, academic achievement, history, and law. This unique periodical keeps home educators, researchers, and others abreast of the most current factual and theoretical research information available on home education.
Homeschool Research Analysis
Growth in the Number of Virginia Homeschoolers
Virginia homeschoolers can make use of either of two main state statutes when homeschooling. One is a general homeschooling statute, the other a religious exemption from compulsory school attendance statute. Thus the proportion of homeschoolers registering under the religious exemption statute is not an accurate measure of the proportion of Virginia homeschoolers who may be homeschooling for religious reasons in whole or in part. The Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Education began gathering figures about the religious exemption in a later year than when it began gathering figures about the general homeschooling statute, so the data series begins with figures reporting the number of children registered under the general statute, followed by one year (1993-1994) in which both the aggregate figure of all homeschooled children and the number of children using the general statute are shown, followed by recent years showing only the aggregate figure of all homeschooled children registered with local school authorities.
The Case for Homeschooling
The public schools are beyond repair. If it is not practical to replace the current system, then at least let those alone who wish to homeschool. Hassle them not. Instead, encourage them and help them. Parents who homeschool their children have three basic complaints against public schools: the lack of academic rigor, the number of maladjusted graduates, and the anti-religious atmosphere. Homeschool advocates claim that homeschooling overcomes these problems. They argue that no matter whether the educational philosophy one holds is that schooling prepares for life or schooling is life, the homeschooled do better. Proponents also claim that private schools are nearly always similar to public schools, so the fundamental criticisms of public schools apply to private schools also, although to a lesser degree.
Statistics and Data for Virginia and the U.S.
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2000-2001
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2000-2001, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2006-2007
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2006-2007, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2002-2003
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2002-2003, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2004-2005
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2004-2005, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2001-2002
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2001-2002, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Sources of Curriculum or Books
Parents of homeschooled students obtain curriculum or books from a wide variety of sources. This study shows that a majority of homeschooled students had parents who used one or more of the following sources of curriculum or books for their children’s home education: a public library (78 percent); a homeschooling catalog, publisher, or individual specialist (77 percent); a retail bookstore or other store (69 percent); and an education publisher that was not affiliated with homeschooling (60 percent). Approximately half of homeschooled students used curriculum or books from homeschooling organizations. Thirty-seven percent of homeschooled students used curriculum or books from a church, synagogue or other religious institution and 23 percent used a curriculum or books from their local public school or district.
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2003-2004
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2003-2004, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2005-2006
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2005-2006, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia DOE Report on Home Instruction
The Virginia Department of Education has compiled statistics on students who are home educated in the state. Choose the report entitled, "Home Instruction."
Statistics and Data for Virginia and the U.S.
The Case for Homeschooling
The public schools are beyond repair. If it is not practical to replace the current system, then at least let those alone who wish to homeschool. Hassle them not. Instead, encourage them and help them. Parents who homeschool their children have three basic complaints against public schools: the lack of academic rigor, the number of maladjusted graduates, and the anti-religious atmosphere. Homeschool advocates claim that homeschooling overcomes these problems. They argue that no matter whether the educational philosophy one holds is that schooling prepares for life or schooling is life, the homeschooled do better. Proponents also claim that private schools are nearly always similar to public schools, so the fundamental criticisms of public schools apply to private schools also, although to a lesser degree.
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2000-2001
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2000-2001, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2006-2007
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2006-2007, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2002-2003
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2002-2003, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2004-2005
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2004-2005, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2001-2002
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2001-2002, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Sources of Curriculum or Books
Parents of homeschooled students obtain curriculum or books from a wide variety of sources. This study shows that a majority of homeschooled students had parents who used one or more of the following sources of curriculum or books for their children’s home education: a public library (78 percent); a homeschooling catalog, publisher, or individual specialist (77 percent); a retail bookstore or other store (69 percent); and an education publisher that was not affiliated with homeschooling (60 percent). Approximately half of homeschooled students used curriculum or books from homeschooling organizations. Thirty-seven percent of homeschooled students used curriculum or books from a church, synagogue or other religious institution and 23 percent used a curriculum or books from their local public school or district.
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2003-2004
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2003-2004, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia Home Education and Religious Exemption Statistics 2005-2006
These are the statistics for the total number of home educators in Virginia during the school year 2005-2006, as well as those homeschooling under the religious exemption rules. Compiled by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).
Virginia DOE Report on Home Instruction
The Virginia Department of Education has compiled statistics on students who are home educated in the state. Choose the report entitled, "Home Instruction."
Homeschool Research Analysis
Growth in the Number of Virginia Homeschoolers
Virginia homeschoolers can make use of either of two main state statutes when homeschooling. One is a general homeschooling statute, the other a religious exemption from compulsory school attendance statute. Thus the proportion of homeschoolers registering under the religious exemption statute is not an accurate measure of the proportion of Virginia homeschoolers who may be homeschooling for religious reasons in whole or in part. The Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Education began gathering figures about the religious exemption in a later year than when it began gathering figures about the general homeschooling statute, so the data series begins with figures reporting the number of children registered under the general statute, followed by one year (1993-1994) in which both the aggregate figure of all homeschooled children and the number of children using the general statute are shown, followed by recent years showing only the aggregate figure of all homeschooled children registered with local school authorities.
The Case for Homeschooling
The public schools are beyond repair. If it is not practical to replace the current system, then at least let those alone who wish to homeschool. Hassle them not. Instead, encourage them and help them. Parents who homeschool their children have three basic complaints against public schools: the lack of academic rigor, the number of maladjusted graduates, and the anti-religious atmosphere. Homeschool advocates claim that homeschooling overcomes these problems. They argue that no matter whether the educational philosophy one holds is that schooling prepares for life or schooling is life, the homeschooled do better. Proponents also claim that private schools are nearly always similar to public schools, so the fundamental criticisms of public schools apply to private schools also, although to a lesser degree.
Featured Resources

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Montessori Method
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Black Books Galore's Guide to Great African American Children's Books
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The Outdoor Life of Children: The Importance of Nature Study and Outside Activities (Charlotte Mason Topics - Volume 2
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Learning Adventures
Each book in the Learning Adventures series covers skills and concepts for grades 4-8, with a history-based approach. Each contains a year's worth of lesson plans in a daily format. All subjects except math are covered.