Homeschooling in Virginia

Classical/Trivium

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Classical Educaiton
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Articles Back to Top
Avoiding Fiction
Douglas Jones
Many parents have objections to using fiction in their homeschooling: it isn't a good use of time, it offers opposing worldviews, it isn't useful. But it can stimulate the imagination and allows a child to put himself in another's place. Douglas Jones discusses why fiction is good for children.
The Lost Tools of Learning
Dorothy Sayers
Is not the great defect of our education today that although we often succeed in teaching our pupils "subjects," we fail lamentably on the whole in teaching them how to think: they learn everything, except the art of learning. Dorothy Sayers authored this essay in 1947, discussing a classical approach to education, with the recommendation to adopt a modified version of the medieval scholastic curriculum.
The Trivium in Biblical Perspective
Robert Booth
The development of the trivium model of classical learning is, perhaps, an example of how unbelievers borrow truth from God's world and yet fail to give God the credit. Believers should adopt or reject the trivium model of learning not for pragmatic reasons but because it is either true or false. the primary concern should be: is it biblical? All truth claims must pass the biblical standard. Robert Booth discusses why the trivium model of learning passes the biblical test.
Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Book?
R.C. Sproul, Jr.
Classical education has at least two distinctive features. First, it operates out of an ancient pedagogy, one that shaped the western world. The trivium is how our ancestors learned, memorizing first, synthesizing second, and then putting it all together in beauty. But the classical model is not only classical in its method, it is classical in its content. That which we study through the trivium are the great works of the western world. That frightens some people because many of these great works are difficult to read. They are big books. Explore why these types of books are so important.

Support Back to Top
Catholic CM/TWTM Swap Group
A curriculum buy, sell, and swap group for those using a Catholic Charlotte Mason/Living Books/Classical method of home education.
Christian Classical Charlotte Mason
This is a loop for Christians who are combining classical education methods with Charlotte Mason ideas in their homeschools.
Classical Conversations
Classical Conversations is a nationwide network of classical, Christian communities providing academic programs, events, and services to local home school communities, parents, and educators.
Classical~Charlotte Mason Material Swap
The Classical Charlotte Mason Swap list is for home schooling families to exchange living books and curricula that are used with the classical (Trivium) method or the Charlotte Mason method. This list does not support one particular way of implementing classical education, but rather is open to methods and materials as recommended in the many books and websites on the subject. Curricula, books, manipulatives, videos, and audios may be posted.
Classically Eclectic
This loop was created for homeschoolers interested in presenting school materials, real books, and/or purchased curriculum in a manner consistent with Classical Education philosophy. Specifically, Classical Education refers to educational models (such as the Trivium) described by Laura Berquist, the Bluedorns, Dorothy Sayers, Doug Wilson, Jessie Wise, Susan Wise Bauer, and others, in which material is presented to children according to their stage of development (i.e., Grammar, Logic, and Rhetoric stages). The purpose of this loop is practical in nature: to share resource suggestions, reviews, schedules, ideas, and encouragement, in order to help one another provide Classical Education within the homeschool environment.
Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum Families
This list is for families using the classical approach to education as outlined in Laura Berquist's book Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum (DYOCC).
LDS Classical Education
A list for LDS homeschoolers seeking a classical education.
Living Math Forum
This is an on-topic list dedicated to the discussion of "living math" - mathematics education using living books and materials, as opposed to traditional curricula as the primary learning tool. Discussion applies to mathematics learning from birth to adult self education, with the understanding that arithmetic is only one feature of mathematics as a whole. Math history topics will apply as well. Educators using Charlotte Mason, Thomas Jefferson Ed (relaxed classical), Montessori, Waldorf and unschooling methods may benefit from the exchange of ideas.
Mother of Divine Grace Families
This list is for families using the classical approach to education as outlined in Laura Berquist's independent study program, Mother of Divine Grace (MODG), and in her book Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum (DYOCC). The discussions on this loop primarily revolve around the implementation and use of resources which are recommended in the MODG syllabi and in DYOCC. Additionally, they always welcome conversations about the classical methodology of MODG/DYOCC.

Links Back to Top
Classical Homeschooling Magazine
Classical Homeschooling Magazine is devoted exclusively to promoting and reporting on the growing revival of classical education for homeschooling parents and students, classical charter and private schools, and great books readers. Topics include the great books movement, the liberal arts, the Socratic method, the paideia reforms, modern media and homeschooling, poetic knowledge, legal implications of homeschooling, ancient Greek education, medieval education, reading lists of the classics of Western civilization, restoring education at home, where to begin and more.
Saint Thomas Aquinas Academy
St. Thomas Aquinas Academy offers a Catholic classical liberal arts curriculum is an independent study program crafted for the home schooling family, for preschool to grade 12.

Classical Education Books Back to Top
  
Classical Education & The Home School
Douglas Wilson; Douglas Jones; Wes Callihan
Publisher: Canon Press
Published: 1999
As we survey the educational ruins around us, classical and Christian education appears to be an idea whose time has come again. More and more Christian parents are seeing the failures of modern education, and they are hungering for a substantive alternative, one that has been tested before and found to be good. Classical and Christian education presents them with such an alternative.
  
Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition
Karen Glass
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Published: 2014
The educators of ancient Greece and Rome gave the world a vision of what education should be. The medieval and Renaissance teachers valued their insights and lofty goals. Christian educators such as Augustine, Erasmus, Milton, and Comenius drew from the teaching of Plato, Aristotle, and Quintilian those truths which they found universal and potent. Charlotte Mason developed her own philosophy of education from the riches of the past, not accidentally but purposefully. She and the other founding members of the Parents’ National Educational Union in England were inspired by the classical educators of history and set out to achieve their vision in modern education. They succeeded—and thanks to Charlotte Mason’s clear development of methods to realize the classical ideals, we can partake of the classical tradition as well. The classical tradition as it informs teaching is good not because it is old or “classical,” but because it works; and what works, whether old or new, is best. That’s the Mason message admirably conveyed by [Karen] Glass.—David V. Hicks. Classical education is an education of the heart and conscience as much as it is an education of the mind. This book explores the classical emphasis on formation of character and links Charlotte Masons ideas to the thinkers of the past. This is not a “how to” book about education, but a “why to” book that will bring clarity to many of the ideas you already know about teaching and learning.
  
Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum: A Guide to Catholic Home Education
Laura Berquist
Publisher: Ignatius Press
Published: 1998
Manufacturer: Ignatius Press
  
First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind
Jessie Wise
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Published: 2002
Parents can assure their child's success in language arts with this simple-to-use, scripted guide. First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind uses picture study and other classical techniques to develop the child's language study in those first two all-important years of school. Each lesson leads the parent, step-by-step, through the simple oral and written projects that build reading, writing, spelling, storytelling, and comprehension skills. Use this book to supplement school learning, or as the center of a home-school language arts course.
  
Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning: An Approach to Distinctively Christian Education (Turning Point Christian Worldview Series)
Doug Wilson
Publisher: Crossway Books
Published: 1991
  
The Case for Classical Christian Education
Douglas Wilson
Publisher: Crossway Books
Published: 2002
  
The Grammar Of Our Civility: Classical Education In America
Lee T. Pearcy
Publisher: Baylor University Press
Published: 2005
  
The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric
Miriam, Sister Joseph
Publisher: Paul Dry Books
Published: 2002
Opening the door for beginners who seek a thorough grounding in the first arts of human understanding, this book explains the nature of logic, grammar, and rhetoric-the three of the seven liberal arts-and how they relate to one another. In Renaissance universities, the trivium (literally, the crossing of three part way) formed the essence of the liberal arts curriculum. Examined are topics such as the nature and function of language, distinguishing general grammar from special grammar, the study of logic and its relationship to grammar and rhetoric, and applying the concepts of logic, grammar, and rhetoric to literary works.
  
The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had
S. Wise Bauer; Susan Wise Bauer
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Published: 2003
An engaging, accessible guide to educating yourself in the classical tradition.

Surrounded by more books than ever, readers today are frequently daunted by the classics they have left unread. The Well-Educated Mind, debunking our own inferiority complexes, is a wonderful resource for anyone wishing to explore and develop the mind's capacity to read and comprehend the "greatest hits" in fiction, autobiography, history, poetry, and drama.

Far from tossing readers into the swarming sea of classics and demanding that they swim, this book offers brief, entertaining histories of five literary genres, accompanied by detailed instructions on how to read each type. The annotated lists at the close of each chapter—ranging from Cervantes to A. S. Byatt, Herodotus to Paul Gilroy—preview recommended reading and encourage readers to make vital connections between ancient traditions and contemporary writing.

Based on the same classical method as Bauer's terrifically successful The Well-Trained Mind, The Well-Educated Mind provides not only a thorough grounding in the classics but also a widely applicable foundation for self-education.

  
The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home, Revised and Updated Edition
Susan Wise Bauer; Jessie Wise
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Published: 2004
"Outstanding...should be on every home educator's reference bookshelf."—Homeschooling Today

This book will instruct you, step by step, on how to give your child an academically rigorous, comprehensive education from preschool through high school. Two veteran home educators outline the classical pattern of education—the trivium—which organizes learning around the maturing capacity of the child's mind: the elementary school "grammar stage," the middle school "logic stage," and the high school "rhetoric stage." Using the trivium as your model, you'll be able to instruct your child in all levels of reading, writing, history, geography, mathematics, science, foreign languages, rhetoric, logic, art, and music, regardless of your own aptitude in those subjects.

Newly revised and updated, The Well-Trained Mind includes detailed book lists with complete ordering information; up-to-date listings of resources, publications, and Internet links; and useful contacts.


Materials Back to Top
Classical Swap
This list is for the buying, selling, and swapping of various homeschool curricula which follow the classical Christian method. This can include (but is not limited to) Veritas Press, Logos School, Christine Miller, Laura Berquist, Doug Wilson, Bluedorns, David Hicks, Dorothy Sayers, and other classical and trivium approaches.


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Our Top Picks
The Case for Classical Christian Education
Douglas Wilson
 
Classical Education & The Home School
Douglas Wilson; Douglas Jones; Wes Callihan
 
The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric
Miriam, Sister Joseph
 
The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home, Revised and Updated Edition
Susan Wise Bauer; Jessie Wise
 
First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind
Jessie Wise
 
 
 
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